ARTICLE TITLE:

REFERENCE TYPE:

AUTHOR(S):

EDITOR(S):

PUBLICATION DATE:

PUBLICATION TITLE:

VOLUME:

PAGES:

ABSTRACT:

Blurred lines between competition and parasitism

Journal Article

Stewart TE; Schnitzer SA

2017

Biotropica

49

433-438

Accurately describing the ecological relationships between species is more than mere semantics–doing so has profound practical and applied implications not the least of which is that inaccurate descriptions can lead to fundamentally incorrect predicted outcomes of community composition and functioning. Accurate ecological classifications are particularly important in the context of global change where species interactions can change rapidly following shifts in species composition. Here we argue that many common ecological interactions–particularly competition and parasitism–can be easily confused and that we often lack empirical evidence for the full reciprocal interaction among species. To make our case and to propose a theoretical framework for addressing this problem we use the interactions between lianas and trees whose outcomes have myriad implications for the ecology and conservation of tropical forests (e.g. Schnitzer et al. 2015).

URL:

Support

The Liana Ecology Project is supported by Marquette University and funded in part by the National Science Foundation.